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Julian Noses
Julian Noses

Logic Pro Recording Software


Logic Remote lets you use your iPhone or iPad to control Logic Pro on your Mac. Use Multi-Touch gestures to play software instruments, mix tracks, and control features like Live Loops and Remix FX from anywhere in the room. Swipe and tap to trigger cells in Live Loops. And tilt your iPhone or iPad up and down and use its gyroscope to manipulate filters and repeaters in Remix FX.




Logic Pro Recording Software



When recording audio or playing a software instrument in Logic Pro, you might experience a slight delay between playing or singing a note and when you hear the sound from your speakers or headphones. This delay is called input monitoring latency. A variety of factors contribute to input monitoring latency, including:


When recording, set the I/O buffer to the lowest setting. If you encounter system overload alerts, increase the I/O buffer size to the next setting. Projects with many tracks or a lot of software instruments require higher I/O buffer sizes, depending on the amount or RAM and the speed of the processor in your Mac.


Certain plug-ins can contribute to input monitoring latency, particularly dynamics plug-ins with look-ahead functions. If you're using these kinds of plug-ins in a project, you can minimize the latency they produce while recording using Low Latency Mode.


Low Latency Mode bypasses plug-ins as needed, so the amount of latency doesn't exceed the Limit setting in the Plug-in Latency section of the General Audio preferences of Logic Pro. Low latency mode is especially useful when you want to record a software instrument in a project that includes latency-inducing plug-ins.


If your Logic Pro project has a lot of audio tracks, software instruments, or plug-ins, you might get a system overload alert that interrupts playback or recording. System overloads can occur when your Mac doesn't have enough processing power to play back or record audio. Use the techniques in this article to avoid system overloads.


That being said, Logic Pro is still limited to the Mac platform, and Pro Tools is still widely used in most professional recording studios, so up-and-coming audio engineers should still make learning Pro Tools the priority. However, here are some instances in which it would also be wise to learn Logic:


Apple's venerable Logic Pro has a long and storied history. Well before the company purchased Emagic, Logic first emerged from the combination of C-Lab's late 1980s programs Creator and Notator on the Atari ST(Opens in a new window). Today, Logic Pro offers pro-level audio editing at a bargain price for multitrack recording, film scoring, sound design, and post. Now with the ability to create Spatial Audio mixes in Dolby Atmos, version 10.7 puts even more pressure on its well-established digital audio workstation (DAW) competitors. Unless you need Avid Pro Tools for compatibility with other studios, or you want to stick with another program simply because you're more familiar with it, Logic Pro remains the top choice for DAWs, and it remains an Editors' Choice winner.


To get started with Logic Pro 10.7, you need a recent Mac running macOS 11.0 or later and 6GB of free space for the base program. To install everything, including all the packaged synths, instruments, loops, and effects, you need to set aside 72GB. As always, Logic Pro doesn't require hardware or software copy protection. As long as you're logged into the Apple Store with your account, you can download, install, and run it seamlessly.


Logic Pro is a stellar recording, editing, mixing, and post-production environment. If you have a Mac and haven't decided on a proper songwriting, recording, or mixing program yet, or if you're aching to upgrade from an earlier version of Logic or even GarageBand (project files from which still open seamlessly in Logic), Logic Pro is your best bet. It's an Editors' Choice winner for DAWs. That said, Pro Tools is another Editors' Choice winner because it's an excellent if expensive tool. If you're already invested in Pro Tools, you may well want to stick with it. If you're committed to working on a PC, it's the clear winner, as Logic Pro is only available on Macs. GarageBand also wins top honors because it's stunningly powerful for a free app that comes with every new Mac.


A consumer-level version based on the same interface and audio engine but with reduced features, called Logic Express, was also available at a reduced cost. Apple's GarageBand comes free with all new Macintosh computers and iOS devices and is another application built on Logic's audio engine. On December 8, 2011, the boxed version of Logic Pro was discontinued, along with Logic Express, and as with all other Apple software for Macs, Logic Pro is now only available through the Mac App Store,[5] or with a discounted Pro Apps for Education Bundle for students through the Apple Store[6] online.


The software instruments included in Logic Pro X include: Drum Kit Designer, Drum Machine Designer, ES, ES2, EFM1, ES E, ES M, ES P, EVOC 20 PolySynth, Sampler, Quick Sampler, Step Sequencer, Klopfgeist, Retro Synth, Sculpture, Ultrabeat, Vintage B3, Vintage Clav, Vintage Electric Piano. These instruments produce sound in various ways, through subtractive synthesis (ES, ES2, ES E, ES M, ES P, Retro Synth), frequency modulation synthesis (EFM1), wavetable synthesis (ES2, Retro Synth), vocoding (EVOC 20 PolySynth), sampling (Sampler, Quick Sampler, Drum Kit Designer), and component modeling techniques (Ultrabeat, Vintage B3, Vintage Clav, and Vintage Electric Piano, Sculpture). As of version 10.2, Logic Pro X also includes Alchemy, a sample-manipulation synthesizer that was previously developed by Camel Audio. The software instruments are activated by MIDI information that can be input via a MIDI instrument or drawn into the MIDI editor.[10]


The application features distributed processing abilities (in 32-bit mode), which can function across an Ethernet LAN. One machine runs the Logic Pro app, while the other machines on the network run the Logic node app. Logic will then offload the effects and synth processing to the other machines on the network. If the network is fast enough (i.e., on the order of gigabit Ethernet), this can work in near real-time, depending on buffer settings and CPU loads. This allows users to combine the power of several Macintosh computers to process Logic Pro's built-in software instruments and plug-ins, and 3rd party processing plug-ins. As of version 10.0.7, Logic can access 24 processing threads, which aligns with the capabilities of Apple's flagship 12-core Mac Pro.[citation needed]


In the United States, its main rivals at the time included Performer and Vision, whereas in Europe its main rivals were Steinberg's Pro 24 and later Cubase. Most MIDI sequencers presented a song as a linear set of tracks. However, Notator and Vision were pattern-based sequencers: songs were built by recording patterns (which might represent for example Intro, Verse, Chorus, Middle-8, Outro) with up to 16 tracks each, then assembling an Arrangement of these patterns, with up to 4 patterns playing simultaneously at any one time in the song.[15] This more closely resembled working principles of hardware sequencers of the 1970s and 1980s.


The C-Lab programmers left that company to form Emagic, and in 1993 released a new program, Notator Logic, which attempted to fuse both track- and pattern-based operation (but looked much more like track-based sequencers than Notator). While rich in features, early versions of Logic on the Atari lacked the intuitiveness and immediacy of either Cubase or Notator, and never achieved the same success. However, by this time the Atari was becoming obsolete, and part of the reason why Notator Logic had been written from scratch with an object oriented GUI (though it shared the same nomenclature as its predecessor) was to make it easier to port to other platforms. The Notator prefix was dropped from the product name and the software became known as simply Logic.


As later versions of the software became available for Mac OS and Windows platforms, and acquired ever more sophisticated functions (especially in audio processing) to take advantage of increased computing power, Logic, together with the rise of the PC, gained popularity again.


Apple acquired Emagic in July 2002.[27] The announcement included the news that development of the Windows version would no longer continue. This announcement caused controversy in the recording industry with an estimated 70,000 users having invested in the Windows route not wishing to reinvest in a complete new system. Despite much speculation in various Pro Audio forums however, exactly how many users may have abandoned Logic upon its acquisition by Apple, or abandoned the Windows platform for the Mac version, remains unknown,[28] but Apple Pro Apps revenue has steadily increased since Apple's acquisition of Emagic,[29] (roughly $2 billion a year as of Q1 2014).


Logic 5 featured significant improvements in user interface, and increased compatibility with more types of computers, operating systems, and a wide range of audio interfaces. Logic 5.5.1 was the last version to be released for Windows. From Logic 6 onwards, the software would only be exclusively available on Mac OS.


With Logic 6, Emagic added the availability of separately packaged software products that were closely integrated add-ons developed specifically for use with Logic, including software instruments, the EXS sampler and audio processing plug-ins. The Logic 6 package also included the stand-alone program Waveburner, for burning redbook audio CD standard-compliant CDR masters for replication, however, that application was considered a free bonus feature; it was not advertised as part of the package and did not include printed documentation. PDF documentation was included on the installer disc.


On July 23, 2009, Logic Pro 9 was announced. A major new feature included "Flex Time", Apple's take on "elastic" audio, which allows audio to be quantized.[31] A version of the pedalboard from GarageBand was included, together with a new virtual guitar amplifier where the modeled components could be combined in different ways. There were also a number of improvements to audio editing, fulfilled user requests such as "bounce in place" and selective track and channel strip import, as well as an expanded content library including one more Jam Pack. Some of the bundled software, including MainStage 2 and Soundtrack Pro 3, was also improved. Logic Pro 9 is Universal Binary, although not officially supported for use on PowerPC computers.[32] SoundDiver, which had been quietly bundled with previous versions, was dropped, eliminating support for arguably the world's most popular synthesizer editor/librarian. As Apple has bundled so many software instruments with Logic, it is not likely that we'll see the return of integration with external synthesizer hardware to the Logic platform.[citation needed] 041b061a72


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